Buzz

Inconceivable

Earlier today I posted an article on my professional website: “Forget SEO — Content is Still King”. A few minutes later, I linked the article on Facebook, where an insightful friend of my replied with this article: “Content Used to Be King. Now It’s the Joker.”

My friend wasn’t being contrary, argumentative or mean. I actually agreed with the article she posted. In fact, nothing in her link disagreed with anything I’d said in my article. The issue wasn’t a collision of concepts, but completely different meanings applied to the same word.

(For the curious, I intended “content” to convey the literal meaning, “the subjects or topics covered in a book or document.” However, sometimes the same word is used to refer to low-paying ghost writing gigs.)

Fortunately, cooler heads prevailed. Neither my friend nor I got snippy. It was easy to see we were talking about two different things, but this well illustrates something that often happens in communication. Just because two people use the same word doesn’t mean they’re saying the same thing. And, conversely, just because two people use a different word it doesn’t mean the disagree.

The key is learning to listen. 

Before you let any conversation get confrontational, take the time to really understand what the other person is saying. Assumption is not your friend in those moments. I don’t care how good you think you are at reading between the lines, it’s always better to dig a little and make sure you’re picking up what the other person is laying down.

(And yes, I know I used the same picture not 10 posts ago. It’s solid quote and a great movie.)

Not Worth It

I know the logic. I’m ashamed to admit I’ve used it, myself. You think you’re a kick-ass multi-tasker and there’s no way you would ever get into an accident because of your phone. You juggle things every day, right? What’s the big deal? It’s not like you’re going to kill someone…

Just a Ride

“A choice, right now, between fear and love…”

Brilliant.

Little Things

Be Happy

I got a bit of disappointing news today.

On the one hand, it’s really not a big deal. Scratch that. It is a big deal. It’s not just not unexpected. I won’t go into details here. It’s a personal matter best left personal. However, in the most general terms, someone (or, this case, someones) made a decision that left me feeling crudy.

The thing is, I know these someones. The thing that happened today doesn’t surprise me in the least. Still, it hurts.

Earlier this week, one of my Facebook friends ask if anyone had suggestions for a word that means happiness in the sense of something more than fleeting joy. Something permanent and deep, something resilient and chosen. I gave a few suggestions, as did several others, but I’m not sure any of us nailed it. I don’t know what the right word for that is, but I know I’m choosing it.

There are all kinds of things that impact our joy in life. Mostly, we point to things outside ourselves, crediting them with our good times and blaming them for our bad. It’s the job we have, the relationship that eludes us, a surplus of unexpected funds, or unfair treatment at the hands of someone else. Ultimately, however, all those outside forces are little things compared to the internal choice we make to either embrace light or embrace darkness.

I know. It sounds all new-agey, but I’m completely serious. The decisions you make are what determine your joy in life. Not your job, your bank account statement, your marital status, your circle of friends, your level of success or your health.

Do those things matter? Of course they do! It’s harder, so much harder, to choose joy in the face of a series of unfortunate circumstances. But…take a deep breath…happiness is still a choice, no matter what’s going on around you.

Anne Frank said, “Think of all the beauty still left around you and be happy.” Anne Frank. If someone living through hell can make such a declaration, just what do we think constitutes a valid excuse for moping around, whining about all the reasons we can’t be happy?

Stop it. Stop it right now.

If you want to be happy, stop focusing on all the reasons you aren’t and focus on all the things you have to celebrate. Make a choice. Don’t be a victim of circumstance. Instead, be the master of your own mood.

Be happy.

Happiness

 

Satisfaction and Success

Another re-post that’s simply too good not to pass along.

The Simple Thing That Makes
the Happiest People in the World So Happy

Eric Barker  |  Time.com

Research has found about 9 zillion things you can do to increase happiness.

Of course, you’re probably not doing any of them. To be fair, most people don’t really do much to deliberately make their lives happier.

Via 100 Simple Secrets of the Best Half of Life: “Researchers found that the majority of the subjects they studied were not able to identify anything they had done recently to try to increase their happiness or life satisfaction.”

So you want to start? You want something insanely easy to do that research has demonstrated over and over again works?

Something that the happiest people in the world all do?

Read more…

The New Rules of Etiquette

Etiquette

An awesome article was published online yesterday by Forbes. So awesome, in fact, there’s no point in summarizing it. Instead, I’m just going to encourage you to read it!

You’ll have to actually click through to read Asghar’s 27 rules, but it’s well worth your time.

27 Etiquette Rules For Our Times
by Rob Asghar  |  Forbes.com

“It is impossible to overlook the extent to which civilization is built upon a renunciation of instinct,” Sigmund Freud said.

There’s always a tension between how much we should follow our instincts and how much we should yield to social conventions. But at times like ours, the tendency is to tilt too far toward our instincts, since the conventions are changing fast and there’s no consensus about them anyway. There’s a risk in that. You don’t know whom you might be offending or how you might be sabotaging your own success.

The original etiquette manuals of Western civilization were in fact success manuals. As author Steven Pinker notes, they taught knights and nobles how to conduct themselves in the court of the king—which is where we get the concepts of “courtly” and “courtesy.”

I asked some tasteful and civilized friends and colleagues what an updated manual for 2014 would look like. Here are 27 rules to help you, whether at an office lunch, the company gym, or the birthday party of your child’s schoolmate.

You’ll notice a common denominator in all of them: Think about other people’s feelings first, because it’s not all about maximizing your personal convenience.

Read more…

Simply True

Don't Matter

Speak Kindness

Kind Words

 

So very true, and yet, so easy to forget.

It takes almost no effort to offer criticism, but compliments sometimes feel like they drain us. What is it we feel like we’re giving up when we send kind words in someone else’s direction? It’s as though we irrationally think there’s some sort of quota on the number of nice things people can say to one another. In speaking kindness to someone else, we seem to believe we’re limiting the amount of kindness that can be returned to us.

Nothing could be further from the truth.

Kindness comes back around, and the raw power of spoken kindness is hard to match. Say something nice to someone today. The act alone will be rewarding, and you might be surprised by how often and how quickly you hear something nice in return.

The Trouble…

You Think You Have Time

Scared

Scared

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